Leading remotely - High-performing days and weeks for you and your team

Are you busy or are you productive? Find out effective techniques that will increase output for you and your team

Stephanie Moore
28th Apr 2020
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Good business growth relies on high-performing people who set themselves up to succeed week in, week out. They respond and perform to the best of their ability. Every individual should work towards a detailed model week that supports the right balance of driving business, planning and sales reporting/administration.
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Leading remotely. High-performing days and weeks for you and your team

 
Time is our most precious commodity; using it wisely can make the difference between success and failure. Do you feel that you are achieving as much as you need to in a day? Are your team delivering as much as they can each week? Do you often hear your people say they are busy? 
Being busy does not equate to being productive.
 
When you're in 'busy mode' you tend to plan your time and daily schedules based on the importance of activities, irrespective of whether these tasks move the business growth dials forward. You focus entirely on 'doing' and little on planning or forecasting, which is why a significant majority of managers and leaders spend substantial amounts of time in day-to-day operations, crisis management and tactical firefighting. If there's a problem, you'll usually find them right at the heart of it.
Yet business growth comes from strategically designing your business for the future and setting your people up for success to deliver it. 
Being a 'productivity ninja'' is centred on valuing your time and the time of others. Question everything you do daily, 'is what I am doing right now worthy of my time?' If not, why are you doing it? Learn to say 'NO' to the unimportant things, and then you will have more time to say 'YES' to the term' ' time management'' suggests you have control over time, which of course you don't. But what you do have control over is how you use your time, and by following these three easy steps, you will be in control of how you use your time and feel more productive as a result.

Time management vs self-management
The term' ' time management'' suggests you have control over time, which of course you don't But what you do have control over is how you use your time, and by following these three easy steps, you will be in control of how you use your time and feel more productive as a result.

Step one – access your time
A good starting point is thinking and analysing your time in terms of;
A Time – Strategic; Activities which strategically move the business forward
B Time – Leading; Activities which are directly linked to leading and managing the team
C Time – Operational; Activities which relate to the day-to-day workings of the business
The example below assesses current time allocation vs. desired time allocation against various A, B and C time activities. This is just an example, use the High-performing week template to assess your time allocation against your A, B and C time activities which make up your typical working day.

 
Step two: map your model week – your high-performing week
Having analysed your time in step one, the next step is mapping your model week to get a view of what your high-performing week would look like.  
Take your A, B and C time activities and map onto your high-performance tracker. Use this as your guide to your high-performing week. 

If you feel you're not productive sense, check your model week and find out what's out of kilt. Have you recruited new team members who are taking up more B Time than you had allocated? Is there a real problem to solve or have you slipped back into too much C Time?  Only you will know what if anything you need to adjust to keep you focused on being productive and not busy.


Step three: take action
Our Focused Five template is a simple tool to allow you to identify quick wins and marginal gains in five focused areas: Stop, Minimise, Maintain, More and Start. Creating effective behavioural change starts with honing in on the things you already do well (the Maintain column) and then working out into the others four areas as follows; Minimise, More, Stop and finally, Start. 
A completed Focused Five could look like this when finished.
 
You'll see not every box is full. The idea is not to complete the entire template for the sake of it, but to draw out the key areas on which to focus. You may have only one or two comments in each column, which are relevant to you. But you must have at least one comment in each column. 

Over time, as you revisit the exercise, you'll find that some things come off your Focused Five and some new comments get added as you achieve your marginal gains. It is designed to be a fluid, agile process and, most importantly, it's been fun and exciting as you take ownership and control of your time. Remember, it's's all about self-management, not time management.

take action; achieve more
  • Download the toolkit and distribute it among your team
  • Use this tool to develop high-performing weeks
  • Determine when you are most productive and allocate these times to focus on strategy and income generation